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Dalhousie University Photograph Collection Item
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Photograph of Sidney E. Smith portrait unveiling

Item is a photograph of the unveiling of Sidney E. Smith's portrait. Sidney E. Smith was the Dean of Law at Dalhousie from 1929 to 1934. Photograph shows Mrs. Smith and an unidentified man unveiling the portrait at the opening of the Weldon Building in 1967.

Wamboldt-Waterfield Photography Limited

Collage of Women Graduates of 1913

Item is a collage of the 1913 women graduates of Dalhousie University. The collage consists of photographs of Louise Clayton, Gladys Sidley, and other students arranged in a circle around a large emblem made up of the letter "D" and the number 13.

Gauvin & Gentzel

Photographic collage of the Red Cap Snow Shoe Club

Item is a photographic collage of the Red Cap Snow Shoe Club. The collage consists of photographs of the members of the club and a dog arranged on a painted background to appear as though the club is standing outside together. Most of the club members are holding snow shoes. The collage is attributed to Halifax Photo.

Engraving of page of book West Port Murders, character statements : [1829]

File is an engraving from book West Port Murders published in 1829. Text reads:
West Port Murders.
Characters
Of
BURK, HARE, AND, Dr. KNOX.
[From the Noctes Ambrosiance of Blackwood's Magazine for March 1829.]
BEING PART OF A CONVERSATION BETWEEN NORTH, TICKLER, AND THE ETTRICK SHEPHERD.

Shepherd. - Did you ever see sic a preparation o' a skeleton o' a turkey? We maun send it to the College Museum, to staun in a glass case aside Burk's.
North. - What did you think, James, of the proceedings of these two Irish gentlemen?
Shepherd. - That the were too monotonous too impress the imagination. First ae drunk auld wife, and then anither drunk auld wife - and then a third drunk auld wife - and then a drunk auld or sick man or twa. The confession got unco monotonous - the Lights and Shadows o' Scottish Death want relief - though, to be sure, poor Peggy paterson, that Unfortunate, broke in a little on the uniformity ; and sae did Daft Jamie ; for whilk last murder, without ony impiety, ane may venture to say, the Devil is at this moment ruggin' that Burk out o' hell fire wi' a three-prong'd fork, and then in wi' him again, through the ribs - and then stirring up the coals wi' that eternal poker - and then wi' the great bellows blawin' up the furnace, till like an Etna, or Mount Vesuvius, it vomits the murderer out again far ower into the very middle o' the floor o' the infernal regions.
R. Menzies, Printer, Edinburgh.

Title page of West Port Murders; or an authentic account of the atrocious murders committed by Burke and his associates : [1829]

File is an engraving from book West Port Murders. Inscription reads: West Port Muders; or an authentic account of the atrocious murders committed by Burke and his associates; containing a full account of all the extraordinary circumstances connected with them. Also, a report of the trial of Burke and McDougal. With a description of the execution of Burke, his confessions, and memoirs of his accomplices, including the proceedings against Hare, &co. Illustrated by portraits and views. "O horror! horror! horror! tongue nor heart cannot conceive nor name thee!" Macbeth. Edinburgh: published by Thomas Ireland, Junior, 57, South Bridge Street. 1829.

Engraving of Portrait of Daft Jamie : [1829]

File is an engraving from book West Port Murders. Inscription reads: Portrait of Daft Jamie. See the impudence of that little boy, challenging Jamie to fight with him ; had Jamie possessed the spink o' a louse, he would have taken him and drawn his neck, as a poultry man draws a hen's; but what else can be expected from such pigmy delinquents, when so much encouragement is given to vice.

Poem of elegiac lines on the tragical murder of poor Daft Jamie

File is a photograph of a poem in a book about the death of Daft Jamie during the West Port Murders by William Burke. Photograph was published in the book West Port Murders in 1829. Poem reads:
Alas! Jamie's Pickled
ELEGIAC LINES
ON THE
Tragical Murder
OF
POOR DAFT JAMIE.

ATTENDANCE give, whilst I relate
How poor Daft Jamie met his fate;
'Twill make your hair stand on your head,
As I unfold the horrid deed :--

That hellish monster, William Burke,
Like Reynard sneaking on the lurk,
Coyduck'd his prey into his den,
And then the woeful work began :--

" Come, Jamie, drink a glass wi' me,
And I'll gang wi' ye in a wee,
To seek yer mither i' the town-
Come drink, man, drink, an' sit ye down."

" Nae, I'll no' drink wi' ye the nou,
For if I div 'twill mak' me fou;"
" Tush, man, a wee will do ye guid,
'Twill cheer yer heart, an' warm yer bluid."

At last he took the fatal glass,
Not dreaming what would come to pass ;
When once he drank, he wanted more--
Till drunk he fell upon the floor.

" Now," said th' assassin, "now we may
Seize on him as our lawful prey."
" Wait, wait," said Hare, " ye stupid ass,
He's yet too strong--let's tak' a glass."

Like some unguarded gem he lies--
The vulture waits to seize its prize;
Nor does he dream he's in its power,
Till it has seized him to devour.

The ruffian dogs,--the hellish pair,--
The villain Burke,--the meagre Hare,--
Impatient were the prize to win,
So to their smothering pranks begin :--

Burke cast himself on Jamie's face,
And clasp'd him in his foul embrace;
But Jamie waking in surprise,
Writhed in an agony to rise.

At last, with nerves unstrung before,
He threw the villain on the floor ;
And though alarm'd, and weaken'd too,
He would have soon o'ercome the foe :

But help was near--for it Burke cried,
And soon his friend was at his side;
Hare tripp'd up Jamie's heels, and o'er
He fell, alas! to rise no more !

Now both these blood-hounds him engage,
As hungry tygers fill'd with rage,
Nor did they handle axe or knife,
To take away Daft Jamie's life.

No sooner done, than in a chest
They cramm'd this lately welcom'd guest,
And bore him into Surgeons' Square--
A subject fresh--a victim rare !

And soon he's on the table laid,
Expos'd to the dissecting blade;
But where his members now may lay
Is not for me--or you--to say.

But this I'll say--some thoughts did rise :
It fill'd the Students with surprise,
That so short time should intervene
Since Jamie on the streets was seen.

But though his body is destroy'd,
His soul can never be decoy'd
From that celestial state of rest,
Where he, I trust, is with the bless'd.

Written by J. P.

N. B.--There is published by the same Editor, (the second Edition with alterations,)
a LACONIC NARRATIVE of the LIFE and DEATH of POOR JAMIE ; in which are inter-
spersed, several Anecdotes relative to him, and his old friend BOBY AWL :--PRICE THRIP
PENCE. The work will be embellished with a striking Portrait of Jamie.
Published by WILLIE SMITH, No. 3, Bristo Port,
PRICE ONE PENNY.

Engraving of Authentic Confessions of William Burk : [1829]

File is an engraving from book West Port Murders published in 1829. Text reads: AUTHENTIC CONFESSIONS OF WILLIAM BURK, Who was Executed at Edinburgh, on 28th January 1829, for Murder, emited before the Sheriff-Substitute of Edinburgh, the Rev. Mr. Reid, Catholic Priest, and others, in the Jail, on 3rd and 22d January. EDINBURGH: Printed and Sold by R. Menzies, Lawnmarket. 1829. Price Twopence.
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