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Davis, Mary

File contains a typed letter unsigned by Kenneth Leslie, written on March 19, 1931 to be sent to Mary Davis of Summit, New Jersey. File addresses outlining an evening of Gaelic dance and music, organized by Kenneth and his first wife, Elizabeth Moir, mentioning the potential of his three young daughters assisting in the dancing. The goal of the program is to display the "instrumental music, song, and dance, expressive of the classic culture of Gaeldom. File also contains a facsimile of Leslie's letter.

Duncan, Pam, Dr.

File contains a typed letter written by Dr. P. [Pam] Duncan of University of Victoria and Dr. J. [Joan] Coldwell of McMaster University, sent to Kenneth Leslie on September 25, 1972. File expresses the authors' interest in including any of "material published or unpublished" that Leslie would be willing to offer to the publication of a literary anthology of psychology courses, featuring works "which illustrate clearly defined psychological states such as depression, euphoria or anxiety" or featuring characters "who might be mentally retarded, paranoid, schizophrenic or addicted to drugs."

Garber, Paul

File contains two letters written by Bishop Paul N. Garber (of Geneva, Switzerland), and one response from Kenneth Leslie, dated March and April 1946. The first letter, dated March 7, 1946, from Garber, informs Leslie of his meeting in Warsaw with Stefan Molski, a correspondent for Leslie's publication The Protestant, and discusses the current tenuous Polish political situation. The response from Leslie, dated April 11, 1946, inquires as to whether Bishop Garber would be willing contribute an article to The Protestant, and gauging Garber's interest in serving as an adviser of the publication's Editorial Board. Garber's response, dated April 17, 1946. affirms his interest in serving as an editorial adviser, but warns that he will also be "very busy" given his need to attend "four annual conferences [held] in rapid succession in Switzerland, Belgium, Czechoslovakia and Poland."

Garrison, Jim

File contains a typed letter (with three lines of handwritten correspondence) sent by Jim Garrison, District Attorney of New Orleans, to Kenneth Leslie, dated January 18, 1973. The typed portion of the letter discusses Garrison's review that was featured in the forthcoming February 1973 issue of Harper's Magazine, where Garrison reviewed the diaries of Arthur Bremer (who attempted to assassinate Governor George Wallace in Laurel, Maryland the previous May). A facsimile of Garrison's review is included in this file. The handwritten postscript to the letter thanks Leslie for publishing Garrison's most recent press release in a recent issue of Leslie's "New Man" publication, and also expresses his thanks for Leslie's gift of a book of his "excellent poems."

Hester, Hugh B.

File contains fourteen draft typed manuscripts columns and handwritten letters, written by Brigadier-General Hugh B. Hester, a noted critic of American foreign policy, written in 1972 and 1973, submitted to numerous newspapers with copies (as well as a couple of personal handwritten letters) sent to Kenneth Leslie. The topics of the letters include the ongoing "disastrous mistake" of the Vietnam War, the "most ballyhooed" nuclear agreements between Nixon and Brezhnev, the 1972 Presidential Election (declaring that Americans "could not psychologically bring themselves to vote for McGovern because his election would have proven true all those crimes committed by Washington [against the Vietnamese people]" and the developing Watergate scandal.

File contains correspondence sent to the Charlotte Observer, the New York Times, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Senator Michael Mansfield (D-MT), The Nation Magazine, the Asheville Citizen, the Chicago Sun-Times, the Greenville News, and Meyer Robert Field.

The letter written to Leslie, dated July 4, 1973, expresses regret at not yet discussing Hester's recent trip to China, as well as demanding that Nixon should "be dismissed and tried" for his actions regarding the escalating Watergate scandal. The file also includes a draft manuscript of a letter "to the Editor" of Leslie's "New Man Magazine", dated November 27, 1972, responding to newspaper magnate John S. Knight proclamation that the "two-party system will continue to be strong and stable" being incorrect following McGovern's defeat, suggesting that "there were no 1972 presidential elections in any meaningful sense".

Ireland, Jean

File contains a handwritten letter sent by Jean Ireland of Sebastopol, CA, dated January 24, 1973, to Kenneth Leslie. The file expresses Ireland's thanks for Leslie sending her a copy of his most recent book of poems, and laments what "skullduggery [sic] will be used as a substitution for war in Indochina since the ceasefire".

Kominsky, Morris

File contains five pieces of typed correspondence written by Morris Kominsky, of Elsinore, CA, between March and July of 1972, and sent to Kenneth Leslie. File contains Kominsky's discussions about the inclusion of his essay "The anatomy of Fascism" in a forthcoming issue of Leslie's publication "New Man" as well as Kominsky's request for dozens of copies; his desire to extend the readership of Kominsky's recent book "The Hoaxers"; and his efforts to expose an extremist plot against targets in Haiphong harbor, Vietnam.

File also contains facsimiles of correspondence sent to Kominsky, including two from sitting members of Congress: Jerome R. Waldie (14th, California) and Victor V. Veysey (38th, California) regarding threats to blow up a dredge in Haiphong harbor "that keeps [it] navigable [during the War]", as instigated in the October 1971 issue of Off-the-Cuff, written and distributed by "avowed member of the John Birch Society", ideologue Nord Davis, Jr. (fragments of which are included).

Latham, Harold S.

File contains an undated Christmas card, likely from the 1950s or early-1960s, sent by Harold S. Latham, of Kearny, NJ (formerly chief editor of Macmillan Publishing Company), to Kenneth Leslie. File briefly recounts Latham's recent trip to Nova Scotia to visit "Five Islands on Minas Basin, Bay of Fundy", and expresses regret at not having heard from Leslie recently. Latham was Leslie's editor when he published his first collection of poems, "Windward Rock" (Macmillan, 1934).

Lischeron, J. N.

File contains an undated (presumably late 1972) handwritten letter, written by J.N. Lischeron (of Windsor, ON) and addressed to Kenneth Leslie. File acknowledges Mr Lischeron's receipt of a copy of Leslie's poetry anthology "O'Malley to the Reds", and mentions the author's "deepest respect [and] great admiration [for Leslie's] forthrightness and courage to maintain the truthfullness [sic]" he upheld whilst publishing The Protestant and The New Man.

Dickson, Rosaleen

File contains an undated [1971 or 1972] typed letter sent to Kenneth Leslie from his daughter, Rosaleen. File contains discussion about sending a selection of typed copies of poems to Mr. [Patrick] Crean at McClelland and Stewart -- the other requested poems stored in boxes at the Dickson farmhouse in Shawville, Quebec -- and also mentions that Sean Haldane, who had previously published the ill-received (by Leslie) "Collected Poems of Kenneth Leslie", had not been informed of the efforts to publish an alternate collection of Leslie's works, and would not be "until it has all been settled".

File also contains a facsimile family photograph of the Dickson children, Jennifer, Elizabeth, Marjorie, Ross, and Charles, likely from 1958, serving as a "Seasons Greetings" card signed "from the Dicksons".

MacLean, M.

File contains a handwritten letter, written by M. MacLean (of Sydney, NS), dated April 14, 1972, and addressed to Kenneth Leslie. File expresses "very great appreciation" of receipt of a copy of 'O'Malley to the Reds', drawing connections to "the powerful image of Dr [Moses] Coady", and happy to discover that he is "still going strong [with] hopes you shall continue your creative works."

McQuinn, Marion and John

File contains an undated Christmas card (presumably early 1970s) sent by Marion and John McQueen to Kenneth Leslie.

Murray, Kaye and R. Charles

File contains a Christmas card, post-marked November 1972, and sent by Kaye & R. Charles Murray (of Lower Sackville, NS), and sent to Kenneth and Nora Leslie.

Nicholson, Marilyn

File contains a four-page handwritten letter by Marilyn Nicholson (dated January 26, 1973) and sent to Kenneth Leslie. File begins with Marilyn expressing her great appreciation for receiving Leslie's 'O'Malley to the Reds' collection of poems, before mentioning her "modest" husband David's "temperature [rising] to 150 degrees and all his blood went to his head" upon being reminded that the piece 'Poetry and propaganda' had been dedicated to him by Leslie. The file then passes on best wishes to Nora, before discussing family goings-on.

Pomeroy, Marine

File contains a handwritten letter postmarked December 7, 1972, written by Marine Pomeroy of The Ladysmith Press, sent to Kenneth Leslie. The file addresses his concerns about Bill Cole republishing two of Leslie's poems in a forthcoming anthology, but reassures Leslie that Cole is "not alienating any rights", and that "we keep all rights" and that the poems are being used "one time only".

Roosevelt, Franklin Delano

File contains a draft of an undated (presumably spring 1943) letter to be sent to American President Franklin Delano Roosevelt, written by Kenneth Leslie. The file addresses concerns raised by the Textbook Commission about a "most regretful anti-Semitic foot note" that appeared in the Roman Catholic version of the New Testament that was issued to all "Catholic personnel of the Army". The offending passage, that the Commission requested be removed from all editions, appeared on page 559: "the Jews are the Synagogues of Satan". The First Lady, Eleanor Roosevelt, had previously been an ardent admirer of Kenneth Leslie's work, giving invaluable endorsements to Leslie on several occasions.

Sackley, Ralph

File contains a typed letter dated May 20th, 1972, and written by Ralph Sackley (of Evanston, IL), sent to Kenneth Leslie. File addresses current reading habits and belief in McGovern in the forthcoming election, before discussing his "oxypheric" nature after Leslie had suffered "lots of strokes" and Sackley's opinions of the mind, deep breathing, and getting "away from self".

Sedgley, Adelaide

File contains a handwritten letter dated January 8th, 1972 and written by Adelaide Sedgley, sent to Kenneth and Nora Leslie. The file expresses Adelaide's appreciation for having such wonderful friends as the Leslies at the age of 91, and expressing gratitude at receiving Leslie's volume of poems, and the "joy [...it] gave to this ancient admirer!"

Shillaker, Robert

File contains two undated letters -- one typed and one handwritten -- sent by Robert Shillaker (Sierra Madre, CA) to Kenneth and Nora Leslie. One letter, likely from late 1972, concerns Shillaker's receipt of an issue of "New Man" containing Kurt Anderson's and Jim Garrison's writings, with requests to be put in contact with the publication The Churchman. The second letter first expresses happiness at receipt of a copy of 'O'Malley to the Reds', before commenting on Leslie's apparent "turning away from orthodox Christianity", as well as his enrolling in the School of Esoteric Studies in New York, and further comments on the ongoing war in Vietnam.

Jamison, Priscilla

File contains a thank-you card (with an Eileen Waring illustration to the front) and letter written to Kenneth Leslie, by his granddaughter Priscilla (daughter of Kathleen). File expresses Priscilla's thanks for a gift from Kenneth and Nora, her appreciation of Leslie's poems when she is feeling down (particularly "Promise", transcribed in its entirety), and her decision to choose the surname "Jamison", "because it was an old family name".

Steinmetz, Harry and Doris

File contains typed correspondence written by Harry and Doris Steinmetz (San Diego, CA), from 1971 and 1973, sent to Kenneth Leslie. The first letter is a fragment, presumably from early 1971, where Harry laments at the quickness of the passing year and his plans for 1971. The second letter, dated January 29, 1973, celebrates Leslie's poetry upon the Steinmetz' receipt of a copy of 'O'Malley to the Reds', as well as discussion on future talks and publications (and was typed on the verso of a promotional flyer "commemorating 50th anniversary of the foudning of the USSR [and the] 40th anniversary of the American Russian Institute" in San Francisco. The third item is a copy of the December 1972 issue of The Gadfly, which contains an excerpt by Harry Steinmetz entitled "Around the world in 66 days with thanks" about his visit to Volgograd.

Stone, Lloyd

File contains an undated Christmas card (presumably 1972) sent by Lloyd, Jessie, and Dale Stone, to Kenneth Leslie. The card expresses gratitude at receipt of a copy of "you book of lovely poems", as well as intentions to renew New Man subscriptions.

Swanson, Rosa

File contains undated handwritten correspondence (presumably 1972 or 1973) written by Mrs. Rosa Swanson (Edmonton, AB) and sent to Kenneth Leslie. File contains the author's confirmation of enclosure of payment to renew subscription to The New Man.

Trudeau, Pierre Elliott

File contains typed correspondence dated June 1, 1973, and sent on "Office of the Prime Minister" letterhead from Pierre Elliott Trudeau, as related by his private secretary, Cécile Viau, and sent to Kenneth Leslie. File expresses that the "Prime Minister was very please to receive a copy" of 'O'Malley to the Reds' and offers appreciation at Leslie's "thoughtful gesture".

Vincent, Clara

File contains handwritten correspondence dated January 26, 1973, sent by Clara M. Vincent (Livonia, MI) to Kenneth Leslie. File expresses her appreciation for receipt of a copy of 'O'Malley to the Reds', discusses the writings and works of Dr. John Nicholls Booth, and states that the Detroit Free Press "continues to be one of the best newspapers in the country, [free from] the Pentagon claptrap and their propaganda".

Wallace, May

File contains handwritten correspondence dated January 2nd, 1973, written by Mrs May Wallace (MacGregor, MB) and sent to Kenneth Leslie. File expresses receipt of Leslie's "most enjoyable" book of poems as well as confirmation that payment was mailed. File also inquires after Leslie's health, wishing for a "happy + prosperous 1973".

Williams, Claude

File contains typed correspondence dated April 20, 1972, written by Claude Williams (Alabaster, AL) and sent to Kenneth Leslie. File expresses thanks for Leslie's handwritten note and for receipt of issues of New Man, and "Glory be! for David Lord coming to the rescue and getting out an issue of New Man" when Leslie was ill the previous year. File states Leslie is "as great a prophet today as Jeremiah was in his day", while expressing opinions about Marxist-Christian dialogue. Williams previously served on the editorial board of The Protestant.

Unidentified correspondence

File contains handwritten correspondence, written between 1966 and 1973, by unidentified authors sent to Kenneth Leslie. File contains 11 different pieces of correspondence by ten different authors. There is a letter written by a Clark H.(Centerville, IA) dated May 11, 1973; an unsigned note about one of Leslie's songs being featured on the Max Ferguson program (dated December 12, 1972); a facsimile letter dated Christmas 1970, providing family updates for "Marge, Eric [not Leslie's brother], and family"; a letter from "L." dated January 14, 1973, acknowledging that it "was very heartwarming to receive the book of poems"; undated from "Fred" (Montclair, NJ); two letters from "Frank" dated December 29th 1965 and January 14, 1966, about strychnine tablets, fluoridation, and general health discussion; an undated unsigned note about enclosure of payment for books and inquiring about Nora's health; a 1972 Christmas card from Deb, Mike, and John, nieces and nephews of Ken and Nora [but unclear as to what part of the family]; a two-page typed letter from "Harold" (Pittsburgh, PA) dated March 22nd, 1973, regarding attendance at the Rationalist Convention in Chicago, about the "destruction and slaughter" in Vietnam, the Pittsburgh highway system, and future issues of New Man; and two undated short notes by "Alice B." including appreciation at receipt of a "gratis" copy of Leslie's book of poems.

Andover-Harvard Theological Library

File contains typed correspondence from the Andover-Harvard Theological Library (Cambridge, MA), dated 1973, and sent to Kenneth Leslie. The first, dated January 8, 1973, sent by Mrs. John Timoney, expresses appreciation for a donated copy of 'O'Malley to the Reds'. The second, undated and sent by William C. Bourque [?], references the library's not having received issues 25:1 thru 25:3 of New Man (Jan-Mar 1973).

Chicago Ministerial Action Committee

File contains typed correspondence dated November 22, 1946, about a resolution passed at a meeting of the Chicago Ministerial Action Committee of The Protestant, at a meeting on November 19, 1946, following questioning of Kenneth Leslie's leadership. The resolution states that "We [...] sincerely deprecate the action of those who have endangered our whole endeavor by placing your position of leadership in a false light, [and] unanimously go on record expressing our complete and sincere loyalty to you." File includes a list of the signatories of the resolution.

Latham, Kathleen

File contains an undated (presumably late-1973) Christmas card sent to Kenneth Leslie ("Daddy and Nora") by his daughter Kathleen (Latham) and her husband George. File discusses a visit with Kathleen's sister (and Kenneth's daughter) Rosaleen the previous fall, and announces the birth of their grandson, Joseph Virgil Latham on December 5th [1973], as well as other family updates.

New York Times

File contains typed correspondence written by Kenneth Leslie on February 23, 1945, and sent "to the Editor of the New York Times". File addresses Leslie's request for print space to respond to a letter previously submitted by Michael Williams (February 22, 1945 issue), and his assertion that Leslie and The Protestant have made "at least one gravely erroneous historical statement". Williams alleged that The Protestant entertains "the notion that in 1929 the Holy See suddenly and in the most sinister alliance with the political and ideological powers of Fascism, Nazism and dictatorships resumed 'political activities' totally suspended since 1870, and apparently for the express purpose of supporting such regimes...', while Leslie responds stating that the notion The Protestant conveyed was to call attention to the "Papacy's abstention from 'overt political activity' between 1870 and 1929".

New York World-Telegram

File contains typed correspondence written, on The Protestant letterhead, by Kenneth Leslie on February 14, 1944, and sent to the editor of the New York World-Telegram. File addresses Leslie's request for print space to respond to articles previously submitted by a Mr. Woltman (February 7, 8, and 9, 1944 issues), and Woltman's "smear attack" assertion that "The Protestant, its Textbook Commission to Eliminate Anti-Semitic Statements in American Textbooks, and myself, as being 'anti-Jewish,' 'anti-Catholic' and unofficial apologists for Communism." Leslie differentiates between Woltman's assertion of Leslie's attacks on Catholicism, calling them rather "taking issue with the political activities of the Vatican and its emissaries". He responds to the "anti-Jewish" assertion stating that the attacks were on the American Jewish Committee "which does not represent the Jews of America". He also reasserts "The Protestant"'s policy of
attacking Fascism here and abroad, irrespective of whether its sponsorship be Protestant, Catholic or Jewish". He finishes by defending accusations of anti-Semitism levied against Pierre van Paassen, Johannes Steel, and Joseph Brainin (fellow editor of The Protestant), stating that "the accuser must be pitied for having exposed his ignorance--or malice--so flagrantly" by accusing "a man of the stature of Pierre van Paassen, whom the Jews in this country, in Europe and in Palestine have come to regard as their greatest champion, [of anti-Semitism]".

Smith College Library

File contains typed correspondence sent from Miss Billie Bozone, librarian at Smith College Library (Northampton, MA), dated January 12, 1973, and sent to Kenneth Leslie. File expresses the author's appreciation at receiving a donated copy of "O'Malley to the Reds".

Kenneth Leslie's sketchbook

File contains an undated No. 7191 "Monterery" drawing spiral sketch book, containing pencil drawings by Kenneth Leslie, with artwork created presumably in the late 1930s or early 1940s. The sketchbook is largely blank, however, there are pencil drawings on the first three pages. The first is a 45° side-on portrait of "R. Currie" signed by Leslie. The second is an untitled study of a woman's face as she leans forward. The third is also untitled, the beginnings of a rural scene with a cabin at the end of a roadway.

Landscape painting

File contains a watercolour painted and signed by Kenneth Leslie, presumably in the late-1930s. The painting depicts a rural setting -- quite likely of somewhere in Pictou County -- with a brown fence in the fore-ground, a narrow peninsula stretching into a river, with low hills in the distance.

Self-portrait of Kenneth Leslie

File contains an undated and incomplete self-portrait, drawn and painted by Kenneth Leslie, likely from the late-1930s. Leslie's head has been fully painted while the rest of his body and the background remain unpainted, a penciled drawing. On the verso of the painting, Leslie has written the following: "This is a self-portrait of / myself when in misery from / the loss of my family. / Ken". It relates to the collapse of his first marriage, wherein his first wife, Elizabeth Moir, left Leslie, taking their children with her.

The Christian glacier : the spirit of Jesus in the Soviet people : [typed draft manuscripts]

File contains two drafts of typed manuscript for an article entitled "The Christian Glacier", written by Kenneth Leslie, presumably in 1958. The second draft, a six-page fragment, discusses the efforts of then-Alberta Premier [Ernest] Manning and Methodist Bishop Bromley Oxnam to "sell war to unsophisticated Christians" by comparing the Soviet Union to the Anti-Christ. File then discusses the evangelization of Madhya Pradesh in India through exploitation of "their poverty and suffering". File then discusses John Foster Dulles's anti-Communist (which Leslie sees as pro-Franco) beliefs, defending the "missionary" efforts of Communism by declaring that "when Spain lay bleeding under the blows of Mussolini and Hitler was it the atheistic Communist society that turned its face away and passed by on the other side, or was it the 'Christian' West?" Includes inked corrections and alterations in Leslie's hand. File also includes an earlier, heavily-annotated, 12-page typed draft with the title "The spirit of Jesus in the Soviet People".

The continuity between instinct and intelligence : [typed manuscript]

File contains a typed manuscript of an essay entitled "The continuity between instinct and intelligence", written by Kenneth Leslie while he was a student at Harvard University, likely in 1915. File also contains handwritten notes and remarks from Leslie's professor, "E.B.H.", presumably Edwin Bissett Holt, lecturer in Psychology.

Cooperation and the whole man : [typed manuscript]

File contains a draft manuscript of an article with the inked title "Cooperation and the whole man", presumably written by Kenneth Leslie, at some point in the early-1940s, for potential inclusion in his periodical "The Protestant digest". File addresses the importance of the Cooperation Movement (in particular the Antigonish Movement) in "dealing with the whole man" when trying to make a difference in a world "full of revolution and war". File contains a few inked corrections and additions.

Leslie, Bertha Starratt

File contains a two-page undated (likely early-1930s) handwritten letter written to Kenneth Leslie by his mother, Bertha Starratt Leslie. File addresses Bertha's thoughts on God and Beauty, stating that "I never could / kneel and worship God as we are expected / to -- God in the abstract -- but Beauty is / something in the abstract I can worship / because there are as many re- / membered places where she has shown a / radiance in almost blinding flashes.". File also expresses her admiration of her son's accomplishments, as well as being thankful that his first wife, Elizabeth is feeling better. Letter is signed "Mother". File also contains a copy of the letter in facsimile.

Radio interview fragments : [typed manuscripts]

File contains two fragments of radio interviews (one dated March 14, 1940, the other undated) involving Kenneth Leslie. The first, titled "Radio Script : Leslie-Merchant" -- discusses Leslie's involvement in the Protestant Digest, and Protestantism in general. The second untitled and undated fragment discusses science and mathematics.

To Armenian Americans : [draft manuscript]

File contains the typed manuscript text of an undated address made (presumably in late 1941 or early 1942) by Kenneth Leslie, to "Mr. Chairman, [...] Archbishop Hovsepian, learned doctors, brave Captain [Jim] Chankalian, [and the] Armenian people". File addresses the Armenian cause and the Russian War Relief effort in the months following the Atlantic Charter.

Music notebook

File contains a bound notebook used by Kenneth Leslie for the purposes of writing musical notations and scores, presumably from the 1930s. The notebook is largely blank, with only four pages used by Leslie. The first page contains an untitled melody fragment four bars long in the F-major key, written in pencil, with notations in both bass and treble. The second page contains a fragment of a song entitled "Sheep and Lambs", with music by Kenneth Leslie and words by Katharine Tynan (misspelled "Katherine"), with treble notations, in 3/4 metre and the F-major key. The third entry is a song entitled "So It Rises So It Soars", with words and music by Leslie, written in G-major key, the first two lines being "Builder of my growing soul / Found in deeply as you must". The fourth and final entry is an eight-bar fragment, in G-major, following a leaf that was torn out.

My love she walks not with me : [manuscript]

File contains a handwritten manuscript of a song entitled "My love she walks not with me", with words and music by Kenneth Leslie, undated (but written presumably in the mid-1930s, after the collapse of his first marriage). The song is written in F-major, contains 24 bars of music in treble, and begins with the lines "The fragrance of the hawthorn and the rose after rain / Makes my misery completer". Music and words are written on only one page.

Translations of Aslaug Vaa poems : [draft manuscripts]

File contains three undated (likely in the 1940s) partial translations of poems originally written by the Norwegian poet Aslaug Vaa (b. Rauland,25 August 1889; d. Oslo, 28 November 1965) and translated by Kenneth Leslie.

File contains translations of the following poems:
- twenty-three lines of the poem "Skinnvengbrev," which begins "Eg tredde eingong du hadde gøymt deg, / at baade du og Gud ha gløymt meg, / og eg blei minst av dei skapte ting.", which Leslie has translated as "I thought one time you had forsaken me / that you and God had forgotten me / and I was least of created things." The header of this leaf has the title "So 6847 Pauline", and the English translation is written directly below the Norwegian original ;
- eight lines of translation of a fourteen line untitled poem, also presumably by Aslaug Vaa, which begins "A, so det vesle båmet reeddest / når det møter det ukjende. / Ein gong i eit framandt land, / sto eg og var dette ukjende for ein liten kropp", which Leslie has translated as "Of course a little child is frightened / when he meets with an unknown one. / Once upon a time on strange soil / I stood and was this unknown one for a little body." The Norwegian text and English translation are written on separate leaves ; and
- four stanzas of the poem 'Duva og Dropen,' which begins "Det kurra ei duve / med bekken Mahala / i skuggen av palmur / og driv kvite kala", which Leslie has translated as "A dove coos so warmly / where murmurs Mahala / In shade of the palm trees / and drifts of white kalla". This item also contains notes for a sermon about avarice written on the verso.

God and the intellectuals : [draft manuscript]

File contains a typed draft manuscript (with a few inked corrections) of a sermon delivered by Kenneth Leslie, likely in the early 1940s, entitled "God and the Intellectual". File addresses the role of colleges in teaching metaphysics, before moving on to the threat posed by "the sickness of America [and the] whole modern world. [...] Call it transcendentalism. Call it idealism" during the Second World War, wherein the motto "transcendentalism : greed' was the antiphonal change for the burying of [early] New England", much as it has been in the run-up to war, and the efforts to prevent the acceptance of "absolute ideas as substitutes for organic thinking", as in fascism, which demands "all or nothing" answers.

Sermon delivered at Abyssinian Baptist Church, Harlem, New York : [draft manuscript]

File contains an undated, untitled fragment (lacking the first of seven pages) of a sermon delivered by Kenneth Leslie at Abyssinian Baptist Church, Harlem, New York. The sermon was likely given October 24th, 1943, entitled "God -- Empty Church", a later version of which appeared in the December 1943 issue of The Protestant. File addresses the threat posed by both the Papacy and Martin Luther to the Baptists, stating that Luther was not "for the people" and that "Baptists ... were massacred with the people by both Luther and the Pope". File expresses the notion that since the success of the Russian Revolution and communism, "the opportunity for free religion is here, [...as] religion has not, nor can be free under capitalism". File also addresses the role in Leslie's 'The Protestant' (The pastor of Abyssinian Baptist Church, Adam Clayton Powell, Jr., was serving on the editorial board of 'The Protestant' at this time) in ensuring the opportunity for free religion in a American capitalist socioeconomic system that prevents it.
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