Print preview Close

Showing 104 results

Archival Description
Leslie, Kenneth North America
Print preview View:

Dickson, Charles

File contains an undated hand-made Christmas card sent to Kenneth Leslie by Leslie's grandson Charles, the son of his daughter Rosaleen Dickson, sometime in the early 1970s. The front of the card depicts a winter sledding scene drawn in pencil, while the interior contains a typed three stanza (12 line) poem beginning "I've travelled here from midnight till noon!", and a handwritten holiday salutation to "Grandad, and Nora!" from Charles.

Dickson, Rosaleen

File contains an undated [1971 or 1972] typed letter sent to Kenneth Leslie from his daughter, Rosaleen. File contains discussion about sending a selection of typed copies of poems to Mr. [Patrick] Crean at McClelland and Stewart -- the other requested poems stored in boxes at the Dickson farmhouse in Shawville, Quebec -- and also mentions that Sean Haldane, who had previously published the ill-received (by Leslie) "Collected Poems of Kenneth Leslie", had not been informed of the efforts to publish an alternate collection of Leslie's works, and would not be "until it has all been settled".

File also contains a facsimile family photograph of the Dickson children, Jennifer, Elizabeth, Marjorie, Ross, and Charles, likely from 1958, serving as a "Seasons Greetings" card signed "from the Dicksons".

Jamison, Priscilla

File contains a thank-you card (with an Eileen Waring illustration to the front) and letter written to Kenneth Leslie, by his granddaughter Priscilla (daughter of Kathleen). File expresses Priscilla's thanks for a gift from Kenneth and Nora, her appreciation of Leslie's poems when she is feeling down (particularly "Promise", transcribed in its entirety), and her decision to choose the surname "Jamison", "because it was an old family name".

Correspondence with friends and researchers

Subseries contains handwritten and typed correspondence sent to Kenneth Leslie, from his friends, supporters, and fellow researchers. Subseries also contains a few pieces of correspondence written by Leslie.

Abels, Lydia

File contains two pieces of correspondence, dated January 1973, sent to Kenneth Leslie by Lydia Abels (Mrs Alexander Hamilton Abels), from Boston, Massachusetts. The first piece of correspondence, dated January 5th, discusses Lydia's declining health. The second piece of correspondence, dated January 8th, mentions Lydia's excitement about receiving a copy of Kenneth Leslie's recent anthology of poems, and how the package "looked exactly like your old Protestant" when it arrived.

Ashworth, Joseph

File contains handwritten correspondence sent by Joseph Ashworth (of Calgary, Alberta) to Kenneth Leslie, dated September 5, 1972. File acknowledges a $5.00 payment for the purchase of one of Leslie's publications, as well as confirming a new mailing address.

Bilainkin, George

File contains two pieces of correspondence written on Royal Commonwealth Society letterhead by George [Bilainkin] in 1972 and 1973 and sent to Kenneth Leslie. The first letter, handwritten and dated September 26, 1972, derides a £220,000 football transfer fee while "pilots are to get £10,3000 a year, [...] railmen are criticized for demanding [a raise of] £20 a week, [and the] chief gets £2500 rise on his lunatic salary of £20,000". The second letter, typed and dated May 19, 1973, derides the "US gangsters" for spreading "inconceivable evil [...] so widely round innocent, harmless creatures, in India and Pakistan, Cyprus and Cuba", the "hoodlum fraud" of the US courts re: Cambodia, the murders which "our BBC and press do not even mention", with the mournful refrain that "this country smells as fearfully as yours -- and none of the citizenry suspects!" Bilainkin was a foreign correspondent and biographer.

Byrne, Florida

File contains a handwritten letter created by Florida L. Byrne (of Tacoma, Washington) dated May 15, 1973, and sent to Kenneth Leslie. Letter gauges Leslie's interest in receiving copies of U.S. Farm News (whose publisher, Fred Stover, "spoke very highly of [Leslie] in one of his letters". Letter also expresses appreciation for receipt of a copy of Leslie's self-published poetry anthology "O'Malley and the Reds and other poems. Finally, letter inquires to the interest in Leslie's receipt of a few books from Mrs Byrne's personal collection.

Ireland, Jean

File contains a handwritten letter sent by Jean Ireland of Sebastopol, CA, dated January 24, 1973, to Kenneth Leslie. The file expresses Ireland's thanks for Leslie sending her a copy of his most recent book of poems, and laments what "skullduggery [sic] will be used as a substitution for war in Indochina since the ceasefire".

Roosevelt, Franklin Delano

File contains a draft of an undated (presumably spring 1943) letter to be sent to American President Franklin Delano Roosevelt, written by Kenneth Leslie. The file addresses concerns raised by the Textbook Commission about a "most regretful anti-Semitic foot note" that appeared in the Roman Catholic version of the New Testament that was issued to all "Catholic personnel of the Army". The offending passage, that the Commission requested be removed from all editions, appeared on page 559: "the Jews are the Synagogues of Satan". The First Lady, Eleanor Roosevelt, had previously been an ardent admirer of Kenneth Leslie's work, giving invaluable endorsements to Leslie on several occasions.

Sackley, Ralph

File contains a typed letter dated May 20th, 1972, and written by Ralph Sackley (of Evanston, IL), sent to Kenneth Leslie. File addresses current reading habits and belief in McGovern in the forthcoming election, before discussing his "oxypheric" nature after Leslie had suffered "lots of strokes" and Sackley's opinions of the mind, deep breathing, and getting "away from self".

Steinmetz, Harry and Doris

File contains typed correspondence written by Harry and Doris Steinmetz (San Diego, CA), from 1971 and 1973, sent to Kenneth Leslie. The first letter is a fragment, presumably from early 1971, where Harry laments at the quickness of the passing year and his plans for 1971. The second letter, dated January 29, 1973, celebrates Leslie's poetry upon the Steinmetz' receipt of a copy of 'O'Malley to the Reds', as well as discussion on future talks and publications (and was typed on the verso of a promotional flyer "commemorating 50th anniversary of the foudning of the USSR [and the] 40th anniversary of the American Russian Institute" in San Francisco. The third item is a copy of the December 1972 issue of The Gadfly, which contains an excerpt by Harry Steinmetz entitled "Around the world in 66 days with thanks" about his visit to Volgograd.

Trudeau, Pierre Elliott

File contains typed correspondence dated June 1, 1973, and sent on "Office of the Prime Minister" letterhead from Pierre Elliott Trudeau, as related by his private secretary, Cécile Viau, and sent to Kenneth Leslie. File expresses that the "Prime Minister was very please to receive a copy" of 'O'Malley to the Reds' and offers appreciation at Leslie's "thoughtful gesture".

Williams, Claude

File contains typed correspondence dated April 20, 1972, written by Claude Williams (Alabaster, AL) and sent to Kenneth Leslie. File expresses thanks for Leslie's handwritten note and for receipt of issues of New Man, and "Glory be! for David Lord coming to the rescue and getting out an issue of New Man" when Leslie was ill the previous year. File states Leslie is "as great a prophet today as Jeremiah was in his day", while expressing opinions about Marxist-Christian dialogue. Williams previously served on the editorial board of The Protestant.

Correspondence of Nora Leslie

File contains correspondence sent to Nora Leslie (née Nora Steenerson Smith, Nora Totten), fourth wife of Kenneth Leslie, from the 1950s to the 1970s. File includes letters and cards sent by Emilie Laraway, Mary Lewis, Helene Mullins, and Elizabeth and John Robertson. File also includes an undated note written by Nora Leslie after Kenneth Leslie's death, regarding a disagreement with Kenneth's daughter Rosaleen. File also includes a photocopy of a clipping of Nora's obituary.

Paricutin Volcano : [draft manuscript]

File contains a handwritten draft manuscript written by Nora Leslie (then Nora Steenerson Totten), likely in the late-1940s or early-1950s. File relates Nora's experiences on an automobile trip in late-January and early-February, 1947, traveling with her husband, the Judge Totten and "Olga", driving from southern California to Paricutín volcano , Michoacán, Mexico. File includes a brief history of the volcano's most recent eruption in 1943, as well as a day-by-day travelogue of the trip to the base of the volcano, and the group's climb to its peak.

Offprint pamphlets from The Protestant

File contains three off-printed pamphlets published by the house of Kenneth Leslie's 1940's periodical The Protestant.

The first pamphlet, ten pages long, is written by Harold L. Ickes, entitled "Protestantism answers hate", was the text of an address delivered by Ickes, Secretary of the Interior, to the 'Protestantism answers hate dinner forum' at the Hotel Roosevelt on Tuesday, February 25, 1941. It did not appear in The Protestant.

The second pamphlet, six pages long in a triptych format, is written by Gerald Richardson, associate editor of The Protestant, entitled "Who is anti-Catholic? A letter which clarifies the position of a true liberal democratic Roman Catholic". The letter previously appeared in the March 1945 issue of The Protestant.

Th third pamphlet, eight pages long, was written by Abraham Pomerantz (and contains an introduction by Kenneth Leslie) entitled "Dissent becomes disloyalty". The article previously appeared in the December 1947 issue of The Protestant.

Press releases from The Protestant press service : [manuscripts]

File contains final drafts of three press releases prepared by Kenneth Leslie's press services at The Protestant. The press releases, undated, were released in 1943 and 1944.

The first release is a single-page handwritten note entitled 'Immediate break with Spain is urged : editor of The Protestant calls also for a Western Front', dated March 24, 1943, and bound for the New York Times.

The second release, typed, undated but shortly after The Protestant was denounced by the "American Jewish Committee [as following] the Communist 'party line'", was written by B.Z. Goldberg, entitled "A mysterious cure for anti-Semitism".

The third release, typed, undated but likely from the summer of 1944, was written by Elbert Aidline-Trommer, entitled "Hitler defeated in Chicago", and discusses Charles J. Anderson Jr.'s failed 1944 "run for Congress in the sixth district as a Republican on a Nazi platform".

Textbook Commission to Eliminate Anti-Semitic Statements in American Textbooks clippings and correspondence

File contains facsimiles of newspaper clippings related to Kenneth Leslie's "Textbook Commission to Eliminate Anti-Semitic Statements in American Textbooks", collected between 1943 and 1946. File includes facsimiles of articles from The Catholic News, Our Sunday Visitor, American Glass Review, The Portland Scribe, among others. File also includes a "Declaration of Principles of the Textbook Commission to Eliminate Anti-Semitic Statements in American Textbooks" broadside; facsimile of a letter sent by John Edgar Hoover to Ben Richardson (of The Protestant) dated December 27, 1945; facsimile correspondence between Richardson and Arthur Lourie of the American Zionist Emergency Council; a facsimile of a letter from L.M. Birkhead (National Director of Friends of Democracy Inc.) to Mrs. F.H. Gray (regarding The Protestant), a three-page letter by Jules Cohen of the Brooklyn Jewish Community Council on the subject of an "observers report on the 'Protestant' rally of March 21, 1946"; and facsimiles of an anti-Semitic poster from the German American Vocational League and an anti-Semitic advertisement for a Henry Ford publication.

Self-portrait of Kenneth Leslie

File contains an undated and incomplete self-portrait, drawn and painted by Kenneth Leslie, likely from the late-1930s. Leslie's head has been fully painted while the rest of his body and the background remain unpainted, a penciled drawing. On the verso of the painting, Leslie has written the following: "This is a self-portrait of / myself when in misery from / the loss of my family. / Ken". It relates to the collapse of his first marriage, wherein his first wife, Elizabeth Moir, left Leslie, taking their children with her.

Translations of Aslaug Vaa poems : [draft manuscripts]

File contains three undated (likely in the 1940s) partial translations of poems originally written by the Norwegian poet Aslaug Vaa (b. Rauland,25 August 1889; d. Oslo, 28 November 1965) and translated by Kenneth Leslie.

File contains translations of the following poems:

  • twenty-three lines of the poem "Skinnvengbrev," which begins "Eg tredde eingong du hadde gøymt deg, / at baade du og Gud ha gløymt meg, / og eg blei minst av dei skapte ting.", which Leslie has translated as "I thought one time you had forsaken me / that you and God had forgotten me / and I was least of created things." The header of this leaf has the title "So 6847 Pauline", and the English translation is written directly below the Norwegian original ;
  • eight lines of translation of a fourteen line untitled poem, also presumably by Aslaug Vaa, which begins "A, so det vesle båmet reeddest / når det møter det ukjende. / Ein gong i eit framandt land, / sto eg og var dette ukjende for ein liten kropp", which Leslie has translated as "Of course a little child is frightened / when he meets with an unknown one. / Once upon a time on strange soil / I stood and was this unknown one for a little body." The Norwegian text and English translation are written on separate leaves ; and
  • four stanzas of the poem 'Duva og Dropen,' which begins "Det kurra ei duve / med bekken Mahala / i skuggen av palmur / og driv kvite kala", which Leslie has translated as "A dove coos so warmly / where murmurs Mahala / In shade of the palm trees / and drifts of white kalla". This item also contains notes for a sermon about avarice written on the verso.

Newspaper clippings related to the Vietnam War and the 1972 presidential election

File contains newspaper clippings collected by Kenneth Leslie in 1972 and 1973, largely related to the 1972 United States presidential election. File contains clippings and facsimiles of articles written by Leslie's associates Hugh Hester and Morris Kominsky, among others. Articles tangentially related to the role of both religion and the Vietnam War in American political affairs during the run-up to the election. A few of the clippings contain notes and marginalia in Leslie's hand.

Reading notes on seminar on Romanticism

File contains a plain green notebook with red plastic spiral binding, used by Kenneth Leslie -- likely in the early 1940s (after 1936) -- for the purposes of compiling reading notes related to a seminar on Romanticism and the Romantic movement in literature. File largely contains Kenneth Leslie's densely-handwritten reading notes relating to his close study of Irving Babbitt's book 'Rousseau and romanticism'. File also contains a short bibliography of works on Romanticism (the latest entry dated 1936, with a reminder to purchase "the Modern Library giant -- Hawthorne" which was first published in 1937.

Latham, Kathleen

File contains an undated (presumably late-1973) Christmas card sent to Kenneth Leslie ("Daddy and Nora") by his daughter Kathleen (Latham) and her husband George. File discusses a visit with Kathleen's sister (and Kenneth's daughter) Rosaleen the previous fall, and announces the birth of their grandson, Joseph Virgil Latham on December 5th [1973], as well as other family updates.

Leslie, Jacquelin

File contains two handwritten letters dated 1971 sent to Kenneth and Nora Leslie, written by Kenneth's niece (daughter of his brother Eric), Jacquelin May Leslie. The first letter, a fragment, discusses Jacquelin's visit to the United States to serve as a caregiver for her friend Mr Eakin (mentioning the illegality of a Canadian citizen working in the U.S.). The second letter discusses receipt of portraits of the Leslies in the mail, her recent move to Toronto (and reminiscences of how "Daddy used to live down the street [Roxborough St. W] in a huge brick house"), the condition of Mr Eakin, well-wishes for Nora's continued recovery, as well as an update on Jacquelin's daughter.

McHugh, Gloria

File contains an undated Christmas card (early 1970s) written by Gloria McHugh, sent to her father, Kenneth Leslie. The card expresses hopes for "good health" and "satisfaction from your much needed work", while expressing regret about delays in writing due to her own illness over the previous summer.

Bell, Jim

File contains a piece of handwritten correspondence sent by Jim K. Bell (Halifax), dated December 28, 1972, to Kenneth Lesile. File acknowledges enclosure of a cheque covering the cost of four copies of Leslie's self-published poetry anthology "O'Malley and the Reds and other poems", as well as a new subscription to The New Man. File also praises Leslie's "determination to resist and fight the fascist bastards" through his continued social-minded publications.

Chapman, G. C.

File contains typed correspondence written by G.C. Chapman (from New Westminster, BC), dated May 11, 1972, and sent to Kenneth Leslie. File acknowledges enclosure of a cheque to ensure renewal of a subscription to Leslie's periodical The New Man.

Daigel, L.

File contains handwritten correspondence written by L. Daigel (of Putney, VT), dated January 1, 1973, and sent to Kenneth Leslie. File acknowledges receipt of a copy of "your book of poems", presumably "O'Malley and the Reds", but laments that "the finest of literature is on the way out" given perceived decline in interest in poetry. File also mentions a cheque enclosure to renew subscription for New Man.

Hester, Hugh B.

File contains fourteen draft typed manuscripts columns and handwritten letters, written by Brigadier-General Hugh B. Hester, a noted critic of American foreign policy, written in 1972 and 1973, submitted to numerous newspapers with copies (as well as a couple of personal handwritten letters) sent to Kenneth Leslie. The topics of the letters include the ongoing "disastrous mistake" of the Vietnam War, the "most ballyhooed" nuclear agreements between Nixon and Brezhnev, the 1972 Presidential Election (declaring that Americans "could not psychologically bring themselves to vote for McGovern because his election would have proven true all those crimes committed by Washington [against the Vietnamese people]" and the developing Watergate scandal.

File contains correspondence sent to the Charlotte Observer, the New York Times, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Senator Michael Mansfield (D-MT), The Nation Magazine, the Asheville Citizen, the Chicago Sun-Times, the Greenville News, and Meyer Robert Field.

The letter written to Leslie, dated July 4, 1973, expresses regret at not yet discussing Hester's recent trip to China, as well as demanding that Nixon should "be dismissed and tried" for his actions regarding the escalating Watergate scandal. The file also includes a draft manuscript of a letter "to the Editor" of Leslie's "New Man Magazine", dated November 27, 1972, responding to newspaper magnate John S. Knight proclamation that the "two-party system will continue to be strong and stable" being incorrect following McGovern's defeat, suggesting that "there were no 1972 presidential elections in any meaningful sense".

Latham, Harold S.

File contains an undated Christmas card, likely from the 1950s or early-1960s, sent by Harold S. Latham, of Kearny, NJ (formerly chief editor of Macmillan Publishing Company), to Kenneth Leslie. File briefly recounts Latham's recent trip to Nova Scotia to visit "Five Islands on Minas Basin, Bay of Fundy", and expresses regret at not having heard from Leslie recently. Latham was Leslie's editor when he published his first collection of poems, "Windward Rock" (Macmillan, 1934).

Lischeron, J. N.

File contains an undated (presumably late 1972) handwritten letter, written by J.N. Lischeron (of Windsor, ON) and addressed to Kenneth Leslie. File acknowledges Mr Lischeron's receipt of a copy of Leslie's poetry anthology "O'Malley to the Reds", and mentions the author's "deepest respect [and] great admiration [for Leslie's] forthrightness and courage to maintain the truthfullness [sic]" he upheld whilst publishing The Protestant and The New Man.

MacLean, M.

File contains a handwritten letter, written by M. MacLean (of Sydney, NS), dated April 14, 1972, and addressed to Kenneth Leslie. File expresses "very great appreciation" of receipt of a copy of 'O'Malley to the Reds', drawing connections to "the powerful image of Dr [Moses] Coady", and happy to discover that he is "still going strong [with] hopes you shall continue your creative works."

Pomeroy, Marine

File contains a handwritten letter postmarked December 7, 1972, written by Marine Pomeroy of The Ladysmith Press, sent to Kenneth Leslie. The file addresses his concerns about Bill Cole republishing two of Leslie's poems in a forthcoming anthology, but reassures Leslie that Cole is "not alienating any rights", and that "we keep all rights" and that the poems are being used "one time only".

Sampson, Ronald

File contains a typed letter dated January 10, 1973, written by Ronald Sampson (of Bath, UK), and mailed to Kenneth and Nora Leslie. The file expresses Sampson's appreciation at the receipt of a copy of 'O'Malley to the Reds', which he "read with very great pleasure". After pointing out some of his favourite lines, Sampson singles out the line "God has gone under for a little bit" as being relevant today, given the "Christmas saturation bombing of Hanoi" which "gives [him] terrible pause to think. Contemporary culture is, to Sampson, indicative of "the total collapse of true religious understanding of the nature of man's relation to the beasts, the physical universe and his brother man".

Sedgley, Adelaide

File contains a handwritten letter dated January 8th, 1972 and written by Adelaide Sedgley, sent to Kenneth and Nora Leslie. The file expresses Adelaide's appreciation for having such wonderful friends as the Leslies at the age of 91, and expressing gratitude at receiving Leslie's volume of poems, and the "joy [...it] gave to this ancient admirer!"

Shillaker, Robert

File contains two undated letters -- one typed and one handwritten -- sent by Robert Shillaker (Sierra Madre, CA) to Kenneth and Nora Leslie. One letter, likely from late 1972, concerns Shillaker's receipt of an issue of "New Man" containing Kurt Anderson's and Jim Garrison's writings, with requests to be put in contact with the publication The Churchman. The second letter first expresses happiness at receipt of a copy of 'O'Malley to the Reds', before commenting on Leslie's apparent "turning away from orthodox Christianity", as well as his enrolling in the School of Esoteric Studies in New York, and further comments on the ongoing war in Vietnam.

Stone, Lloyd

File contains an undated Christmas card (presumably 1972) sent by Lloyd, Jessie, and Dale Stone, to Kenneth Leslie. The card expresses gratitude at receipt of a copy of "you book of lovely poems", as well as intentions to renew New Man subscriptions.

Tunnicliffe, John

File contains handwritten correspondence dated March 19th, 1972, written by John Tunnicliffe (Warwickshire, England) and sent to Kenneth Leslie. File expresses appreciation of the recent receipt of an issue of New Man, as well as remarking on his church work, having been ordained in 1910, and efforts at working on a memoir. He also remarks that one of his sons "is [now] vicar of a large new (pagan) parish not far from here" as well as relating a humorous anecdote about his son getting jam on his nose, and how he couldn't lick it off, while an elder brother suggested that "there's a chap at our school who can lick jam off his nose but he is a Roman Catholic."

The stone god : a drama in four acts : [draft manuscript]

File contains an early draft manuscript of a four-act dramatic play entitled "The stone god", written by Nora Leslie (then Nora Steenerson Totten), likely in the 1950s. The play contains four characters: the protagonist, Ellen Maria; her husband, an archaeologist named Jens; Ellen Maria's cousin, a theologian named Johannes; and a forester named Steffa.

New man

File contains textual records pertaining to Kenneth Leslie's religio-political publication New-Man.

Kenneth Leslie's office diary for the year 1943

File contains the hardcover (red cloth) office diary kept by Kenneth Leslie's secretaries at the main offices of The Protestant Digest in New York for the year 1943. File contains a day-by-day breakdown of Leslie's meetings and correspondence sent, preparations for several issues of the magazine, progress with the development of the Textbook Commission, and accounts of the general comings and goings in the office. Kenneth Leslie's future third wife, and one of his secretaries, Cathy, is mentioned by name a few times herein.

Kenneth Leslie's sketchbook

File contains an undated No. 7191 "Monterery" drawing spiral sketch book, containing pencil drawings by Kenneth Leslie, with artwork created presumably in the late 1930s or early 1940s. The sketchbook is largely blank, however, there are pencil drawings on the first three pages. The first is a 45° side-on portrait of "R. Currie" signed by Leslie. The second is an untitled study of a woman's face as she leans forward. The third is also untitled, the beginnings of a rural scene with a cabin at the end of a roadway.

Landscape painting

File contains a watercolour painted and signed by Kenneth Leslie, presumably in the late-1930s. The painting depicts a rural setting -- quite likely of somewhere in Pictou County -- with a brown fence in the fore-ground, a narrow peninsula stretching into a river, with low hills in the distance.

Results 1 to 50 of 104