Item MS-2-165, SF Box 25, Folder 43 - Manuscript of "The Early Scotch Settlers of Cape Breton" by M.D. Morrison

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Title proper

Manuscript of "The Early Scotch Settlers of Cape Breton" by M.D. Morrison

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  • Textual record

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Item

Reference code

MS-2-165, SF Box 25, Folder 43

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Issuing jurisdiction and denomination (philatelic)

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Date(s)

  • 1931 (Creation)

Physical description area

Physical description

30 pages

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Archival description area

Name of creator

Biographical history

Murdoch Daniel Morrison was born on April 8, 1867 in Englishtown, Nova Scotia, the eldest son of Neil and Margaret Morrison. He taught school for several years after graduating from Sydney Academy and later continued on to study medicine at Dalhousie University and Bellevue Hospital Medical College, New York.

Morrison was licensed in Nova Scotia in 1895 and practised first in Reserve Mines and then in Dominion, Cape Breton. In 1899 he married Katy McDonald, with whom he had at least one son, Clarence Morrison. He moved to Halifax in 1917 to take up an appointment as the medical officer for the newly formed Workmen's Compensation Board, where he was primarily responsible for advising on permanent disability estimates. He retired from medicine in 1937.

Morrison was a member of the North British Society and the Nova Scotia Historical Society. He had a keen interest in the history of the Highland Scots in Nova Scotia and the work of the Gaelic College at St. Anne's and its annual Mod (Gaelic cultural competition). He wrote and published several historical articles, including “Religion in Old Cape Breton,” which appeared in The Dalhousie Review (1940), and "The Migration of Scotch Settlers from St. Ann's, Nova Scotia to New Zealand, 1851-1860" in Collections of the Nova Scotia Historical Society 22 (1933). He passed away in Halifax on May 14, 1946 after being hit by a taxi.

Custodial history

The item was accessioned by Dalhousie University Archives in 1972. The custodial history is unknown.

Scope and content

Item is a manuscript of an unpublished article titled "The Early Scotch Settlers of Cape Breton" written for presentation to the "Literary branch of the Guild" in Dominion, Nova Scotia. Attached is a letter written by Morrison to a Mr. McIntosh, requesting the manuscript's return and the reader's spelling corrections of Gaelic words.

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  • English

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Public domain. Materials do not circulate and must be used in the Archives and Special Collections Reading Room.

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Further accruals are not expected.

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Dates of creation, revision and deletion

May 2012

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Script of description

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