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Kenneth Leslie fonds File
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Williams, Claude

File contains typed correspondence dated April 20, 1972, written by Claude Williams (Alabaster, AL) and sent to Kenneth Leslie. File expresses thanks for Leslie's handwritten note and for receipt of issues of New Man, and "Glory be! for David Lord coming to the rescue and getting out an issue of New Man" when Leslie was ill the previous year. File states Leslie is "as great a prophet today as Jeremiah was in his day", while expressing opinions about Marxist-Christian dialogue. Williams previously served on the editorial board of The Protestant.

Wallace, May

File contains handwritten correspondence dated January 2nd, 1973, written by Mrs May Wallace (MacGregor, MB) and sent to Kenneth Leslie. File expresses receipt of Leslie's "most enjoyable" book of poems as well as confirmation that payment was mailed. File also inquires after Leslie's health, wishing for a "happy + prosperous 1973".

Vincent, Clara

File contains handwritten correspondence dated January 26, 1973, sent by Clara M. Vincent (Livonia, MI) to Kenneth Leslie. File expresses her appreciation for receipt of a copy of 'O'Malley to the Reds', discusses the writings and works of Dr. John Nicholls Booth, and states that the Detroit Free Press "continues to be one of the best newspapers in the country, [free from] the Pentagon claptrap and their propaganda".

Unidentified correspondence

File contains handwritten correspondence, written between 1966 and 1973, by unidentified authors sent to Kenneth Leslie. File contains 11 different pieces of correspondence by ten different authors. There is a letter written by a Clark H.(Centerville, IA) dated May 11, 1973; an unsigned note about one of Leslie's songs being featured on the Max Ferguson program (dated December 12, 1972); a facsimile letter dated Christmas 1970, providing family updates for "Marge, Eric [not Leslie's brother], and family"; a letter from "L." dated January 14, 1973, acknowledging that it "was very heartwarming to receive the book of poems"; undated from "Fred" (Montclair, NJ); two letters from "Frank" dated December 29th 1965 and January 14, 1966, about strychnine tablets, fluoridation, and general health discussion; an undated unsigned note about enclosure of payment for books and inquiring about Nora's health; a 1972 Christmas card from Deb, Mike, and John, nieces and nephews of Ken and Nora [but unclear as to what part of the family]; a two-page typed letter from "Harold" (Pittsburgh, PA) dated March 22nd, 1973, regarding attendance at the Rationalist Convention in Chicago, about the "destruction and slaughter" in Vietnam, the Pittsburgh highway system, and future issues of New Man; and two undated short notes by "Alice B." including appreciation at receipt of a "gratis" copy of Leslie's book of poems.

Tunnicliffe, John

File contains handwritten correspondence dated March 19th, 1972, written by John Tunnicliffe (Warwickshire, England) and sent to Kenneth Leslie. File expresses appreciation of the recent receipt of an issue of New Man, as well as remarking on his church work, having been ordained in 1910, and efforts at working on a memoir. He also remarks that one of his sons "is [now] vicar of a large new (pagan) parish not far from here" as well as relating a humorous anecdote about his son getting jam on his nose, and how he couldn't lick it off, while an elder brother suggested that "there's a chap at our school who can lick jam off his nose but he is a Roman Catholic."

Trudeau, Pierre Elliott

File contains typed correspondence dated June 1, 1973, and sent on "Office of the Prime Minister" letterhead from Pierre Elliott Trudeau, as related by his private secretary, Cécile Viau, and sent to Kenneth Leslie. File expresses that the "Prime Minister was very please to receive a copy" of 'O'Malley to the Reds' and offers appreciation at Leslie's "thoughtful gesture".

Translations of Aslaug Vaa poems : [draft manuscripts]

File contains three undated (likely in the 1940s) partial translations of poems originally written by the Norwegian poet Aslaug Vaa (b. Rauland,25 August 1889; d. Oslo, 28 November 1965) and translated by Kenneth Leslie.

File contains translations of the following poems:
- twenty-three lines of the poem "Skinnvengbrev," which begins "Eg tredde eingong du hadde gøymt deg, / at baade du og Gud ha gløymt meg, / og eg blei minst av dei skapte ting.", which Leslie has translated as "I thought one time you had forsaken me / that you and God had forgotten me / and I was least of created things." The header of this leaf has the title "So 6847 Pauline", and the English translation is written directly below the Norwegian original ;
- eight lines of translation of a fourteen line untitled poem, also presumably by Aslaug Vaa, which begins "A, so det vesle båmet reeddest / når det møter det ukjende. / Ein gong i eit framandt land, / sto eg og var dette ukjende for ein liten kropp", which Leslie has translated as "Of course a little child is frightened / when he meets with an unknown one. / Once upon a time on strange soil / I stood and was this unknown one for a little body." The Norwegian text and English translation are written on separate leaves ; and
- four stanzas of the poem 'Duva og Dropen,' which begins "Det kurra ei duve / med bekken Mahala / i skuggen av palmur / og driv kvite kala", which Leslie has translated as "A dove coos so warmly / where murmurs Mahala / In shade of the palm trees / and drifts of white kalla". This item also contains notes for a sermon about avarice written on the verso.

To Armenian Americans : [draft manuscript]

File contains the typed manuscript text of an undated address made (presumably in late 1941 or early 1942) by Kenneth Leslie, to "Mr. Chairman, [...] Archbishop Hovsepian, learned doctors, brave Captain [Jim] Chankalian, [and the] Armenian people". File addresses the Armenian cause and the Russian War Relief effort in the months following the Atlantic Charter.

The stone god : a drama in four acts : [draft manuscript]

File contains an early draft manuscript of a four-act dramatic play entitled "The stone god", written by Nora Leslie (then Nora Steenerson Totten), likely in the 1950s. The play contains four characters: the protagonist, Ellen Maria; her husband, an archaeologist named Jens; Ellen Maria's cousin, a theologian named Johannes; and a forester named Steffa.

The problem of the bridge : [typed manuscript]

File contains an undated (presumably 1913 or 1914, while a student at the University of Nebraska) typed manuscript entitled "The problem of the bridge", written by Kenneth Leslie, and submitted to his professor as part of a course in philosophy. The "bridge" of which Leslie writes is discussing the "problem of metaphysical knowledge". File discusses the Eleatics, Aristotle, Descartes, Spinoza, Locke, Berkeley, Hume and Kant in relation to metaphysical knowledge.

The importance of the Mindszenty case : [draft manuscript]

File contains a draft handwritten (in pencil) manuscript entitled "The importance of the M. case" [Mindszenty case], written in early 1949 by Kenneth Leslie, presumably for consideration of inclusion in his periodical 'The Protestant', or as research notes for his publication "Hungary -- Christian or Pagan? : an eyewitness report" (published in late 1949). File discusses the arrest in Hungary of Cardinal József Mindszenty for anti-Communist activities in late-1948 (after all religious orders had been banned in Hungary), and espouses Leslie's belief that "our American newspapers [...] responded like a well-trained pointer, [...touching] the well-established pro-Catholic nerve and the newer Truman cold-war nerve."

The continuity between instinct and intelligence : [typed manuscript]

File contains a typed manuscript of an essay entitled "The continuity between instinct and intelligence", written by Kenneth Leslie while he was a student at Harvard University, likely in 1915. File also contains handwritten notes and remarks from Leslie's professor, "E.B.H.", presumably Edwin Bissett Holt, lecturer in Psychology.

The Christian glacier : the spirit of Jesus in the Soviet people : [typed draft manuscripts]

File contains two drafts of typed manuscript for an article entitled "The Christian Glacier", written by Kenneth Leslie, presumably in 1958. The second draft, a six-page fragment, discusses the efforts of then-Alberta Premier [Ernest] Manning and Methodist Bishop Bromley Oxnam to "sell war to unsophisticated Christians" by comparing the Soviet Union to the Anti-Christ. File then discusses the evangelization of Madhya Pradesh in India through exploitation of "their poverty and suffering". File then discusses John Foster Dulles's anti-Communist (which Leslie sees as pro-Franco) beliefs, defending the "missionary" efforts of Communism by declaring that "when Spain lay bleeding under the blows of Mussolini and Hitler was it the atheistic Communist society that turned its face away and passed by on the other side, or was it the 'Christian' West?" Includes inked corrections and alterations in Leslie's hand. File also includes an earlier, heavily-annotated, 12-page typed draft with the title "The spirit of Jesus in the Soviet People".

Textbook Commission to Eliminate Anti-Semitic Statements in American Textbooks clippings and correspondence

File contains facsimiles of newspaper clippings related to Kenneth Leslie's "Textbook Commission to Eliminate Anti-Semitic Statements in American Textbooks", collected between 1943 and 1946. File includes facsimiles of articles from The Catholic News, Our Sunday Visitor, American Glass Review, The Portland Scribe, among others. File also includes a "Declaration of Principles of the Textbook Commission to Eliminate Anti-Semitic Statements in American Textbooks" broadside; facsimile of a letter sent by John Edgar Hoover to Ben Richardson (of The Protestant) dated December 27, 1945; facsimile correspondence between Richardson and Arthur Lourie of the American Zionist Emergency Council; a facsimile of a letter from L.M. Birkhead (National Director of Friends of Democracy Inc.) to Mrs. F.H. Gray (regarding The Protestant), a three-page letter by Jules Cohen of the Brooklyn Jewish Community Council on the subject of an "observers report on the 'Protestant' rally of March 21, 1946"; and facsimiles of an anti-Semitic poster from the German American Vocational League and an anti-Semitic advertisement for a Henry Ford publication.

Swanson, Rosa

File contains undated handwritten correspondence (presumably 1972 or 1973) written by Mrs. Rosa Swanson (Edmonton, AB) and sent to Kenneth Leslie. File contains the author's confirmation of enclosure of payment to renew subscription to The New Man.

Such a din! : poems

File contains Kenneth Leslie's personal copy of his collection of poems, 'Such a din!', published in 1936. Leslie used this copy as a working copy when compiling his anthology of poems, 'O'Malley to the Reds and other poems" in 1972. File contains inked corrections, additions, and excisions in Leslie's hand (addition of dedications -- largely to Robert Norwood -- for a few poems, as well as a few title and spelling changes, with poems not be included in the anthology crossed out).

Stone, Lloyd

File contains an undated Christmas card (presumably 1972) sent by Lloyd, Jessie, and Dale Stone, to Kenneth Leslie. The card expresses gratitude at receipt of a copy of "you book of lovely poems", as well as intentions to renew New Man subscriptions.

Steinmetz, Harry and Doris

File contains typed correspondence written by Harry and Doris Steinmetz (San Diego, CA), from 1971 and 1973, sent to Kenneth Leslie. The first letter is a fragment, presumably from early 1971, where Harry laments at the quickness of the passing year and his plans for 1971. The second letter, dated January 29, 1973, celebrates Leslie's poetry upon the Steinmetz' receipt of a copy of 'O'Malley to the Reds', as well as discussion on future talks and publications (and was typed on the verso of a promotional flyer "commemorating 50th anniversary of the foudning of the USSR [and the] 40th anniversary of the American Russian Institute" in San Francisco. The third item is a copy of the December 1972 issue of The Gadfly, which contains an excerpt by Harry Steinmetz entitled "Around the world in 66 days with thanks" about his visit to Volgograd.

Stationery from The Protestant and The new Christian

File contains two leaves of stationery with the letterheads of two of Kenneth Leslie's periodical publications. The first is the letterhead of The Protestant, from the late-1940s, when The Protestant had moved operations back to Nova Scotia. The letterhead reads The Protestant, with "Cambridge Station, Nova Scotia" beneath the main title. On the left margin is the list of names on the editorial board of The Protestant, with Kenneth Leslie as "editor", Rev. John Tunnicliffe as "associate editor", and 52 others listed as "editorial advisers". The second is the letterhead for Leslie's next publication, "The New Christian", with "Kenneth Leslie, editor, publisher" at the left margin and "Pictou, Nova Scotia" at the right margin.

Smith College Library

File contains typed correspondence sent from Miss Billie Bozone, librarian at Smith College Library (Northampton, MA), dated January 12, 1973, and sent to Kenneth Leslie. File expresses the author's appreciation at receiving a donated copy of "O'Malley to the Reds".

Shillaker, Robert

File contains two undated letters -- one typed and one handwritten -- sent by Robert Shillaker (Sierra Madre, CA) to Kenneth and Nora Leslie. One letter, likely from late 1972, concerns Shillaker's receipt of an issue of "New Man" containing Kurt Anderson's and Jim Garrison's writings, with requests to be put in contact with the publication The Churchman. The second letter first expresses happiness at receipt of a copy of 'O'Malley to the Reds', before commenting on Leslie's apparent "turning away from orthodox Christianity", as well as his enrolling in the School of Esoteric Studies in New York, and further comments on the ongoing war in Vietnam.

Sermon delivered at Abyssinian Baptist Church, Harlem, New York : [draft manuscript]

File contains an undated, untitled fragment (lacking the first of seven pages) of a sermon delivered by Kenneth Leslie at Abyssinian Baptist Church, Harlem, New York. The sermon was likely given October 24th, 1943, entitled "God -- Empty Church", a later version of which appeared in the December 1943 issue of The Protestant. File addresses the threat posed by both the Papacy and Martin Luther to the Baptists, stating that Luther was not "for the people" and that "Baptists ... were massacred with the people by both Luther and the Pope". File expresses the notion that since the success of the Russian Revolution and communism, "the opportunity for free religion is here, [...as] religion has not, nor can be free under capitalism". File also addresses the role in Leslie's 'The Protestant' (The pastor of Abyssinian Baptist Church, Adam Clayton Powell, Jr., was serving on the editorial board of 'The Protestant' at this time) in ensuring the opportunity for free religion in a American capitalist socioeconomic system that prevents it.

Self-portrait of Kenneth Leslie

File contains an undated and incomplete self-portrait, drawn and painted by Kenneth Leslie, likely from the late-1930s. Leslie's head has been fully painted while the rest of his body and the background remain unpainted, a penciled drawing. On the verso of the painting, Leslie has written the following: "This is a self-portrait of / myself when in misery from / the loss of my family. / Ken". It relates to the collapse of his first marriage, wherein his first wife, Elizabeth Moir, left Leslie, taking their children with her.

Sedgley, Adelaide

File contains a handwritten letter dated January 8th, 1972 and written by Adelaide Sedgley, sent to Kenneth and Nora Leslie. The file expresses Adelaide's appreciation for having such wonderful friends as the Leslies at the age of 91, and expressing gratitude at receiving Leslie's volume of poems, and the "joy [...it] gave to this ancient admirer!"

Sampson, Ronald

File contains a typed letter dated January 10, 1973, written by Ronald Sampson (of Bath, UK), and mailed to Kenneth and Nora Leslie. The file expresses Sampson's appreciation at the receipt of a copy of 'O'Malley to the Reds', which he "read with very great pleasure". After pointing out some of his favourite lines, Sampson singles out the line "God has gone under for a little bit" as being relevant today, given the "Christmas saturation bombing of Hanoi" which "gives [him] terrible pause to think. Contemporary culture is, to Sampson, indicative of "the total collapse of true religious understanding of the nature of man's relation to the beasts, the physical universe and his brother man".

Sackley, Ralph

File contains a typed letter dated May 20th, 1972, and written by Ralph Sackley (of Evanston, IL), sent to Kenneth Leslie. File addresses current reading habits and belief in McGovern in the forthcoming election, before discussing his "oxypheric" nature after Leslie had suffered "lots of strokes" and Sackley's opinions of the mind, deep breathing, and getting "away from self".

Roosevelt, Franklin Delano

File contains a draft of an undated (presumably spring 1943) letter to be sent to American President Franklin Delano Roosevelt, written by Kenneth Leslie. The file addresses concerns raised by the Textbook Commission about a "most regretful anti-Semitic foot note" that appeared in the Roman Catholic version of the New Testament that was issued to all "Catholic personnel of the Army". The offending passage, that the Commission requested be removed from all editions, appeared on page 559: "the Jews are the Synagogues of Satan". The First Lady, Eleanor Roosevelt, had previously been an ardent admirer of Kenneth Leslie's work, giving invaluable endorsements to Leslie on several occasions.

Reading notes on seminar on Romanticism

File contains a plain green notebook with red plastic spiral binding, used by Kenneth Leslie -- likely in the early 1940s (after 1936) -- for the purposes of compiling reading notes related to a seminar on Romanticism and the Romantic movement in literature. File largely contains Kenneth Leslie's densely-handwritten reading notes relating to his close study of Irving Babbitt's book 'Rousseau and romanticism'. File also contains a short bibliography of works on Romanticism (the latest entry dated 1936, with a reminder to purchase "the Modern Library giant -- Hawthorne" which was first published in 1937.

Radio interview fragments : [typed manuscripts]

File contains two fragments of radio interviews (one dated March 14, 1940, the other undated) involving Kenneth Leslie. The first, titled "Radio Script : Leslie-Merchant" -- discusses Leslie's involvement in the Protestant Digest, and Protestantism in general. The second untitled and undated fragment discusses science and mathematics.

Protestant-related press clippings

File contains facsimiles of newspaper clippings collected by Kenneth Leslie, between 1939 and 1946, containing articles (complimentary or otherwise) about Leslie's periodical 'The Protestant'. File includes clippings from America: A Catholic Review, the Brooklyn Eagle, the Brooklyn Tablet, the Fayetteville (N.C.) Advocate, the International Jewish Press Bureau, the Jewish Advocate, the Jewish Examiner, the Memphis Press Scimitar, the New York Times, the New York World Telegram, the Southern Israelite, among others.

Promotional materials for poetry readings

File contains two undated promotional leaflets (likely from the late 1930s or early 1940s, promoting Kenneth Leslie poetry readings and discussions. The earliest of the two leaflets, on off-white paper, is entitled "Kenneth Leslie / Poetry Readings -- Discussions / Mr. Leslie / Reads His Own Poetry / Discusses Contemporary Poetry / Helps you Develop Your Poetry" and contains a small portrait of a youthful Leslie wearing a fedora. It contains testimonials from Charles G.D. Roberts, Robert Norwood, and Lawrence H. Conrad on the verso. The second leaflet, printed on yellow paper, also undated, but after 1938, is entitled "Kenneth Leslie : Singer-Composer / Poet", contains a portrait of Leslie to the upper left corner, with a short bibliography (ending in "By Stubborn Stars". The front contains words promoting Leslie's talent from 'Voices', 'London Times', Sir Charles Roberts, 'N.Y. Herald Tribune', 'Halifax Chronicle', Reverend Sister Maura, 'Charlottetown Guardian', and Shaemas O'Sheel, while the verso has further testimonials under the heading "What they say of Kenneth Leslie's poetry...." with the sub-headings "In London, England", "In Toronto", "In New York", and "In Charlottetown".

Press releases from The Protestant press service : [manuscripts]

File contains final drafts of three press releases prepared by Kenneth Leslie's press services at The Protestant. The press releases, undated, were released in 1943 and 1944.

The first release is a single-page handwritten note entitled 'Immediate break with Spain is urged : editor of The Protestant calls also for a Western Front', dated March 24, 1943, and bound for the New York Times.

The second release, typed, undated but shortly after The Protestant was denounced by the "American Jewish Committee [as following] the Communist 'party line'", was written by B.Z. Goldberg, entitled "A mysterious cure for anti-Semitism".

The third release, typed, undated but likely from the summer of 1944, was written by Elbert Aidline-Trommer, entitled "Hitler defeated in Chicago", and discusses Charles J. Anderson Jr.'s failed 1944 "run for Congress in the sixth district as a Republican on a Nazi platform".

Pomeroy, Marine

File contains a handwritten letter postmarked December 7, 1972, written by Marine Pomeroy of The Ladysmith Press, sent to Kenneth Leslie. The file addresses his concerns about Bill Cole republishing two of Leslie's poems in a forthcoming anthology, but reassures Leslie that Cole is "not alienating any rights", and that "we keep all rights" and that the poems are being used "one time only".

Political and imperialism fragments : [draft manuscripts]

File contains two undated typed fragments, likely written in the 1940s, by Kenneth Leslie. The first fragment, a five-page selection, discusses religion in regards to imperialism, largely dealing with China and eastern Asia. The second fragment, one page long discusses politics and "one's objective obligation to history". Both fragments contain numerous annotated with corrections and alterations in ink.

Paricutin Volcano : [draft manuscript]

File contains a handwritten draft manuscript written by Nora Leslie (then Nora Steenerson Totten), likely in the late-1940s or early-1950s. File relates Nora's experiences on an automobile trip in late-January and early-February, 1947, traveling with her husband, the Judge Totten and "Olga", driving from southern California to Paricutín volcano , Michoacán, Mexico. File includes a brief history of the volcano's most recent eruption in 1943, as well as a day-by-day travelogue of the trip to the base of the volcano, and the group's climb to its peak.

Open publicity is the weapon of democracy : confused liberals get unconfused, now let them get going : [draft manuscript]

File contains a draft typed manuscript, undated (but probably from 1943) written by Kenneth Leslie. File consists of a letter to American liberals and those who wish "the world had joined together against Fascism", rallying them to join the Protestant's Textbook Commission to Eliminate Anti-Semitic Statements in American Textbooks.

Offprint pamphlets from The Protestant

File contains three off-printed pamphlets published by the house of Kenneth Leslie's 1940's periodical The Protestant.

The first pamphlet, ten pages long, is written by Harold L. Ickes, entitled "Protestantism answers hate", was the text of an address delivered by Ickes, Secretary of the Interior, to the 'Protestantism answers hate dinner forum' at the Hotel Roosevelt on Tuesday, February 25, 1941. It did not appear in The Protestant.

The second pamphlet, six pages long in a triptych format, is written by Gerald Richardson, associate editor of The Protestant, entitled "Who is anti-Catholic? A letter which clarifies the position of a true liberal democratic Roman Catholic". The letter previously appeared in the March 1945 issue of The Protestant.

Th third pamphlet, eight pages long, was written by Abraham Pomerantz (and contains an introduction by Kenneth Leslie) entitled "Dissent becomes disloyalty". The article previously appeared in the December 1947 issue of The Protestant.

Notes, articles and clippings related to fluoridation

File contains research notes and articles collected by Kenneth Leslie in the mid-1960s related to fluoridation. File contains correspondence written by Miss Jean M. Ross submitted to The Rt. Hon. L[ester] B. Pearson and The Hon. Judy LaMarch, as well as Dr. G.D.W. Cameron [Deputy Minister of National Health], a copy of Miss Ross's 12-page publication 'The fluoridation fraud', as well as pamphlets and articles from the the Fraser Burgh Herald, the New York Times, Pure Water Association of Santa Clara County, and the Greater Milwaukee Committee Against Fluoridation.

Nicholson, Marilyn

File contains a four-page handwritten letter by Marilyn Nicholson (dated January 26, 1973) and sent to Kenneth Leslie. File begins with Marilyn expressing her great appreciation for receiving Leslie's 'O'Malley to the Reds' collection of poems, before mentioning her "modest" husband David's "temperature [rising] to 150 degrees and all his blood went to his head" upon being reminded that the piece 'Poetry and propaganda' had been dedicated to him by Leslie. The file then passes on best wishes to Nora, before discussing family goings-on.

Newspaper clippings related to the Vietnam War and the 1972 presidential election

File contains newspaper clippings collected by Kenneth Leslie in 1972 and 1973, largely related to the 1972 United States presidential election. File contains clippings and facsimiles of articles written by Leslie's associates Hugh Hester and Morris Kominsky, among others. Articles tangentially related to the role of both religion and the Vietnam War in American political affairs during the run-up to the election. A few of the clippings contain notes and marginalia in Leslie's hand.

New York World-Telegram

File contains typed correspondence written, on The Protestant letterhead, by Kenneth Leslie on February 14, 1944, and sent to the editor of the New York World-Telegram. File addresses Leslie's request for print space to respond to articles previously submitted by a Mr. Woltman (February 7, 8, and 9, 1944 issues), and Woltman's "smear attack" assertion that "The Protestant, its Textbook Commission to Eliminate Anti-Semitic Statements in American Textbooks, and myself, as being 'anti-Jewish,' 'anti-Catholic' and unofficial apologists for Communism." Leslie differentiates between Woltman's assertion of Leslie's attacks on Catholicism, calling them rather "taking issue with the political activities of the Vatican and its emissaries". He responds to the "anti-Jewish" assertion stating that the attacks were on the American Jewish Committee "which does not represent the Jews of America". He also reasserts "The Protestant"'s policy of
attacking Fascism here and abroad, irrespective of whether its sponsorship be Protestant, Catholic or Jewish". He finishes by defending accusations of anti-Semitism levied against Pierre van Paassen, Johannes Steel, and Joseph Brainin (fellow editor of The Protestant), stating that "the accuser must be pitied for having exposed his ignorance--or malice--so flagrantly" by accusing "a man of the stature of Pierre van Paassen, whom the Jews in this country, in Europe and in Palestine have come to regard as their greatest champion, [of anti-Semitism]".

New York Times

File contains typed correspondence written by Kenneth Leslie on February 23, 1945, and sent "to the Editor of the New York Times". File addresses Leslie's request for print space to respond to a letter previously submitted by Michael Williams (February 22, 1945 issue), and his assertion that Leslie and The Protestant have made "at least one gravely erroneous historical statement". Williams alleged that The Protestant entertains "the notion that in 1929 the Holy See suddenly and in the most sinister alliance with the political and ideological powers of Fascism, Nazism and dictatorships resumed 'political activities' totally suspended since 1870, and apparently for the express purpose of supporting such regimes...', while Leslie responds stating that the notion The Protestant conveyed was to call attention to the "Papacy's abstention from 'overt political activity' between 1870 and 1929".

My love she walks not with me : [manuscript]

File contains a handwritten manuscript of a song entitled "My love she walks not with me", with words and music by Kenneth Leslie, undated (but written presumably in the mid-1930s, after the collapse of his first marriage). The song is written in F-major, contains 24 bars of music in treble, and begins with the lines "The fragrance of the hawthorn and the rose after rain / Makes my misery completer". Music and words are written on only one page.

Music notebook

File contains a bound notebook used by Kenneth Leslie for the purposes of writing musical notations and scores, presumably from the 1930s. The notebook is largely blank, with only four pages used by Leslie. The first page contains an untitled melody fragment four bars long in the F-major key, written in pencil, with notations in both bass and treble. The second page contains a fragment of a song entitled "Sheep and Lambs", with music by Kenneth Leslie and words by Katharine Tynan (misspelled "Katherine"), with treble notations, in 3/4 metre and the F-major key. The third entry is a song entitled "So It Rises So It Soars", with words and music by Leslie, written in G-major key, the first two lines being "Builder of my growing soul / Found in deeply as you must". The fourth and final entry is an eight-bar fragment, in G-major, following a leaf that was torn out.

Murray, Kaye and R. Charles

File contains a Christmas card, post-marked November 1972, and sent by Kaye & R. Charles Murray (of Lower Sackville, NS), and sent to Kenneth and Nora Leslie.

McQuinn, Marion and John

File contains an undated Christmas card (presumably early 1970s) sent by Marion and John McQueen to Kenneth Leslie.

McHugh, Gloria

File contains an undated Christmas card (early 1970s) written by Gloria McHugh, sent to her father, Kenneth Leslie. The card expresses hopes for "good health" and "satisfaction from your much needed work", while expressing regret about delays in writing due to her own illness over the previous summer.

McHugh, Dermot and Anita

File contains a handwritten letter (dated April 29, 1972), written by Anita and Dermot McHugh (grandson of Kenneth Leslie, son of Gloria), addressed to Kenneth Leslie. File addresses the McHughs' gratitude for the Leslies best wishes regarding their recent wedding, appreciation of the Leslies' being "very generous and kind in [their] gift-giving", and concern regarding Kenneth and Nora's poor health.

Magic : [typed manuscript]

File contains a typed manuscript essay entitled "Magic", written by Kenneth Leslie on October 8, 1913, when he was a student at the University of Nebraska. File addresses the role of sympathetic magic and mimetic magic in "modern scientific methods and principles". File discusses the notions of "post hoc ergo propter hoc", "similia similibus", and "Homo mensura", with examples.
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