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Archival Description
Bible Hill (N.S.)
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Agricultural archives reference collection

  • MS-14-REF
  • Collection
  • 1819-2007

This series contains 53 books, 8 booklets, and 164 cm of other textual and graphic material related to agriculture, which includes related organizations, industries, machinery, research, products, livestock, harvesting, management, crops, etc. These were published between 1846-2000.

Entomology

This series consists of 42 publications, which is comprised of 40 books and 2 miscellaneous textual records relating to entomology. These were published by the Nova Scotia Institute of Science, the Canadian Department of Agriculture, and the United States Department of Agriculture, published between 1915-1983.

G C Retson fonds

  • MS-14-13, MS-14 Box 6, Folders 1-10
  • Fonds
  • 1948-1961

This fonds consists of reports and publications, most written by G C Retson, related to farming in Canada. Topics include strawberries, apples, dairy, milk, hogs, poultry, livestock and other topics across mainly Atlantic Canada.

An autobiography : the story of my life

  • MS-14-42, MS-14, Box 135, Folder 21
  • File
  • 1996

This file contains "An autobiography : the story of my life" by William (Bill) Angus Jenkins. Truro, Nova Scotia. October, 1996.

Poultry plucking machine patent

  • MS-14-43, MS-14, Box 134, Folder 3
  • File
  • 1944

This poultry plucking machine patent was issued on July 4th, 1944 to Angus Edward Banting, Truro, NS. Banting signed all his rights, title and interest of the invention over to the Department of Agriculture and Marketing of the Province of Nova Scotia. https://www.dal.ca/about-dal/dalhousie-originals/edward-angus-banting.html Edward Angus Banting (1908-1966) was a visionary who understood the importance of innovation and technology and its application to the field of agriculture. That spark of ingenuity and inventiveness ran in the family: Banting, born in Ontario in 1908, was the nephew of Sir Frederick Banting, the Canadian Nobel laureate and co-discoverer of insulin as a treatment for diabetes. After earning his Engineering degree and Education diploma at the Ontario Agricultural College, the younger Banting taught high school before moving to Nova Scotia to become the first professor of agricultural engineering at the former Nova Scotia Agricultural College. In addition to establishing the field of agricultural engineering in the province, he was a leader in land drainage and marshland reclamation and a founding member of the Canadian Farm Building Plan Service in Truro. But it wasn’t until World War II that he had the opportunity to truly leave his mark. It was a time when women were taking on an increasing amount of leadership on the family farm, with their husbands off to war. Suddenly, tasks once socialized as gender-specific became universal, challenging farmers and farm industrialists to develop new techniques and technologies. Professor Banting, on his part, focused on improving the messy and unpleasant task of plucking chickens. Together with his fellow engineers at what is now Dal’s Agricultural Campus, he invented a simple and inexpensive poultry plucking device, constructed from easily accessible materials. You can find the 1944 patent for his device today in the Agricola Collection in the MacRae Library. Perhaps what’s most notable about it is that no royalties were charged: anyone who wanted a copy of the plans could secure a set for twenty-five cents at the time. Requests for the machine came in from all over Canada, parts of the U.S, a number of European countries and at least one from Asia and several from Australia. In 1945, Banting was reporting that at least 20 requests were coming in per week. It’s an example of the innovative thinking and leadership that garnered Banting international acclaim. He capitalized on available resources — both human and machine — to improve an agricultural process through technology and innovation. His legacy lives on not only through the values of Dal’s Agricultural Campus, but the physical campus itself: with the Agricultural Engineering building that bears his name.

Banting, Angus

Nova Scotia Association of Garden Clubs history

  • MS-14-50
  • File
  • [2015?]

This file is a copy of the Nova Scotia Association of Garden Clubs History Update 2009- 2014 by Arthur Haskins, Historian. The Nova Scotia Association of Garden Clubs became an entity in 1954 as the result of the work of the Rural Beautification Project Committee. In 1944, the Rural Beautification Committee was appointed by the Honorable John A. MacDonald, minister of Agriculture, to come up with a plan for rural beautification projects. Mr. Nick Jankov, a Landscape Specialist, began working with the Agricultural Representatives, Women’s Institutes, Home and School Associations and Service Clubs, to begin formulating a long term plan for Rural Beautification around the province. The Nova Scotia Association of Garden Clubs (NSAGC) is made up of garden clubs and horticultural societies from all areas of Nova Scotia. The NSAGC is the coordinating body for organized gardening groups in the province and is guided by an elected board of directors, whose members come from the different districts of Nova Scotia. The district representative, also known as the district director, serves as the link between the individual clubs and the NSAGC board. The main objective of the NSAGC is to promote the general landscape beautification of the Province of Nova Scotia, by promoting community beautification and encouraging the formation of horticultural groups (garden clubs) which will procure interest in all phases of home gardening and ornamental horticulture in their areas.

Lieutenant Colonel A. (Arthur) W. MacKenzie interview transcript

  • MS-14-40, MS-14, Box 135, Folder 5
  • File
  • 1969

This item is a transcript of interview with Lieutenant Colonel A. (Arthur) W. MacKenzie – NSAC Class ’21, former faculty member NSAC circa 1930s (?), former Minister of Agriculture for Nova Scotia. Interviewer NSAC Professor of English – Jack Hawkins. 1969.

Lily Fraser Cameron scrapbook

  • MS-14-39, OVR Box 4, Folder 1
  • File
  • 1940

This file contains Lily Fraser Cameron's scrapbook created from her attendance at the Nova Scotia Agricultural College. It contains a combination of: - NSAC commencement booklets from 1 May 1940, 30 April 1941, 29 April 1942, 22 April 1943. - Black and White photographs - Newspaper clippings relating to NSAC academics and sports, as well as WWII - Personal letters, postcards, and greeting cards from family and friends - NSAC "winged" crest (sew/iron-on) - Dried flowers and dance cards - Acceptance letter dated May 29142 from the McDonald College of McGill University (stating her as the first female NSAC graduate to attend the agriculture program at McDonald College).

Library journal subscriptions

This file contains the correspondence between Nova Scotia Agricultural College Library and the Nova Scotia Department of Agriculture regarding subscribing scientific journals. Also contains a notebook with publications ordered by Nova Scotia Department of Agriculture branch Chem. Soils and Fertilizer (1952-1975).

Henry Ford helped Nova Scotia to increase food production

This file contains an account of the donation of a tractor by Henry Ford to the Nova Scotia Agricultural College in 1917. Mr Ford had previously met then Premier the Honorable George H Murray and was introduced to Melville Cumming, Secretary for Agriculture and Principal of NSAC (1905-1927). There are annotations on the first page "Thanks very much - Len" and on the second page "He was here I understand on a trout fishing exhibition (expedition?)."

Melville Cumming papers

This file contains 2 articles and a speech prepared by Nova Scotia Agricultural College Principal Melville Cumming regarding W. H. Brittain - Provincial Entomologist (Nova Scotia) , and the Nova Scotia Agricultural College.

Plant diversity meeting summary

This file contains a meeting summary between staff of the Nova Scotia Agricultural College, Nova Scotia Museum, and Ross Farm Museum that was held at the Nova Scotia Museum, Halifax on June 17, 1987. The focus of meeting was in identifying, and understanding more about, historical varieties of crops and of educating the public about changes in plant material and the important of genetic diversity in 1987.

Correspondence

This sub-series contains inter-department correspondences and faculty speeches of the Nova Scotia Agricultural College. These were published between 1911-1975.

Administration records

This series contains publications related to the record keeping of faculty and facilities, of the Nova Scotia Agricultural College between 1912-1986. It is arranged into three sub-series, Annual reports, Correspondences, and Facilities - Buildings.

Cox Building extension

This file contains a copy of the site plan for Cox Building extension at the Nova Scotia Agricultural College in 1986. It also includes correspondence from Dr. Robert Prange to Dr. H. MacRae.

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