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Antitheses, No. 3

In this paper, James Dinwiddie writes his own opinions on knowledge and religion. This file consists of one journal.

Astronomy

In this scientific journal, James Dinwiddie focuses on astronomy. He discusses the solar system, sunspots, comets, and the moon. This file consists of one journal.

Astronomy

This series of notes written by James Dinwiddie focuses on astronomy. Dinwiddie discusses the properties of the moon and outlines the lunar cycle as well as the phenomenon of comets. He provides a list of well known astronomers and their publications including Isaac Newton, Rene Descartes, Johannes Kepler, Socrates, Nicolas Copernicus, Otto Guernicke, Galileo, Ptolemy, and Edmond Halley.

Ballistics; Fortifications; Redoubts; Macedonian Phalanx

These lecture notes written by James Dinwiddie discuss a number of topics related to the military including fortifications, ballistics, redoubts, and the Macedonian Phalanx. Dinwiddie mentions various materials for building fortifications, armour, and weapons. He also records the arrangement of the Macedonian Phalanx.

Balloting List for Managers

This document from the Royal Institution from May 1, 1812 is a ballot list for managers. This file consists of one printed page.

Balloting List for Visitors

This document from the Royal Institution from May 1, 1812 is a ballot list for visitors. This file consists of one printed page.

By-law Regarding Associate Members

This document sent to James Dinwiddie from the Royal Institution outlines a by-law passed June 18, 1814 allowing associate members to use A.R.I. as a postnomial. This file consists of two printed pages.

Cartography

This scientific journal by James Dinwiddie focuses on navigation by stars which is demonstrated through a series of calculations. This file consists of one journal.

Chemical

In this scientific journal, James Dinwiddie discusses various topics in chemistry including the effects of fire, water, acids, and bases on mixtures. He also notes the properties of different types of air such as fixed air, nitrous air, and inflammable air. This file consists of one journal.

Chronometer Journal

This notebook kept by James Dinwiddie between October 3, 1792 and August 31, 1793 contains observations from a chronometer recorded during his journey from London to China. The file consists of 19 pages of notes.

Credo Chinesa

James Dinwiddie records his observations on China in this notebook. He makes several notes about geography, animal life, and various customs. This file consists of one notebook.

Diving Bell

These notes written by James Dinwiddie ca. 1793 discuss the diving bell including various experiments to examine its properties.

Dynamics: 1. On the distinguishing properties of matter; 2. On the perserverance of matter; 3. Of the powers and activity of matter

These notes written by James Dinwiddie focus on matter. The notes are split into three sections; the first deals with the properties of matter including various propositions. The second discusses the perserverance of matter or what happens when forces are applied. The final section deals with the powers of matter and involves inertia and resistance.

Early Experiments

This journal by James Dinwiddie written ca. 1774 has a list of philosophical queries as well as a list of materials. This file consists of one journal.

Early Experiments

This journal by James Dinwiddie written in 1777 lists a number of experiments related to electricity and electrical phenomena. This file consists of one journal.

Early Experiments

This journal by James Dinwiddie records some of his experiments with air and balloons. This file consists of one journal.

Electricity, No. 1,3

These lecture notes written by James Dinwiddie ca. 1793 focus on electricity including electric machines, electrometers, lightning, and conductors.

Elementary Bodys [sic]

These notes written by James Dinwiddie concern "Elementary Bodys [sic]". Dinwiddie briefly discusses chemical compositions in one set of notes. In the second set, he discusses motion and the necessity of experimentation in understanding nature.

Experimental Philosophy

These notes written by James Dinwiddie in 1801 outline a course in experimental philosophy. The lecture topics include matter, space, gravity, engines, projectiles, and pendula.

Experiments of Factitious Air

These notes written by James Dinwiddie focus on experiments involving air; he documents his procedures as well as the results. Dinwiddie includes a hand-drawn diagram of various scientific apparatus at the front of the notes.

Extracts

In this journal begun May 17, 1796 while in Calcutta, James Dinwiddie summarizes extracts from reports on a range of topics. He notes observations on "Dr. Black's Analysis of the Iceland waters" and "Extract from the report of the Committee for improving the manufacture of powder at Bombay" as well as others. This file consists of one journal.

Fine Arts, No. 1

These lecture notes written by James Dinwiddie ca. 1793 focus on architecture. Dinwiddie mentions building practices for arches, bridges, and porticos.

Fireworks, No. 1-3

These lecture notes written by James Dinwiddie in 1792 include lists of recipes for making various types of fireworks.

Five letters to James Dinwiddie from W. Hart Stevenson

INDICES:::W. Hart Stevenson ; 1789 ; 1787 ; drawing frame ; John ; engine ; spinning frame ; spindles ; machinery ; Doctor Stewarts ; Devil ; cylinder ; brass ; iron ; Blair ; Spanish Ambassador ; Mrs. Miller ; Dictionary ; electrical ; steam ; Smith ; Glasgow ; Jeremy ; Crimea ; Russia ; Bentham ; Blackstones Commentaries ; artillery ; Biggans ; Lunardi ;

Galvanic Experiments

In this scientific journal by James Dinwiddie, he describes a number of galvanic experiments. This file consists of one journal.

Introduction

This introductory lecture written by James Dinwiddie discusses natural philosophy. Dinwiddie draws on past philosophers including Rene Descartes, Plato, and John Locke to describe Nature and man's relationship with her.

Introduction; Mechanics

These notes written by James Dinwiddie focus on topics in mechanics such as gravity, momentum, compound engines, and Ferguson's machine as well as matter, magnetism, electric shock, and capillary action in the introductory section.

Introductory Lecture

James Dinwiddie wrote this introductory lecture on January 19, 1792. He discusses knowledge, existence, and sensation and quotes Rene Descartes (Cogito ergo sum).

Journal

INDICES:::Proudfoot ; Journal

Journal

This personal journal written by James Dinwiddie spans the period of January 25, 1780 to March 25, 1780. During this time, Dinwiddie was in Drogheda and Dublin.

Journal

This personal journal written by James Dinwiddie spans the period of April 25, 1780 to June 1, 1780. During this period, Dinwiddie was in Dublin.

Journal

This personal journal written by James Dinwiddie spans the period of June 2, 1780 to September 6, 1780. During this period, Dinwiddie resided in Dublin.

Journal

This personal journal written by James Dinwiddie spans the period of September 10, 1780 to December 31, 1780. During this time, Dinwiddie resided in Cork (Sept. 10 - Nov. 7), Kilkenny, and Dublin.
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